Brand Archetypes

The Caregiver brand archetype can be summed up in two words: compassionate and self-sacrificing. Picture the empathetic nurse or the helpful concierge, and you will see how the Caregiver archetype is a personality fit for brands that aim to nurture or serve others, from healthcare to nonprofits, to hospitality industries.   Brand archetypes are the […]

Brand Archetypes

The Caregiver brand archetype can be summed up in two words: compassionate and self-sacrificing. Picture the empathetic nurse or the helpful concierge, and you will see how the Caregiver archetype is a personality fit for brands that aim to nurture or serve others, from healthcare to nonprofits, to hospitality industries.   Brand archetypes are the […]

The Caregiver brand archetype can be summed up in two words: compassionate & self-sacrificing: Meet the Caregiver

Putnam Marketing Portfolio Archetypes

January 22, 2023

Putnam Marketing Portfolio Archetypes

The Caregiver brand archetype can be summed up in two words: compassionate and self-sacrificing.

Picture the empathetic nurse or the helpful concierge, and you will see how the Caregiver archetype is a personality fit for brands that aim to nurture or serve others, from healthcare to nonprofits, to hospitality industries.
 
Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are an essential tool for any marketing toolbox! To learn more, read the introduction here.

The CAREGIVER

  • PROMISE: Treat your neighbor as yourself.
  • CORE DESIRE: To protect people from harm
  • GOAL: To help others
  • FEAR: Selfishness and ingratitude
  • STRATEGY: Do things for others
  • GIFT: Compassion and generosity
  • MOTIVATION: Stability and control

All About the Caregiver

The Caregiver derives meaning from helping others. This brand archetype is moved by compassion and generosity and strives to make people feel nurtured and secure. For the Caregiver, the worst fears are 1) neglecting loved ones and 2) instability, due to the impact it will have on the less fortunate.
 
The Caregiver archetype is often associated with the maternal and paternal instincts parents have in protecting their children, to the point of self-sacrifice. They give of themselves to make sure others are cared for.
 
This archetype is seen in teachers, nurses, and at the organizational level, churches, insurance agencies, and hotels. Well-known examples of the Caregiver archetype are Mother Teresa, Princess Diana, Habitat for Humanity, Campbell’s, and The Salvation Army.

The Caregiver in Action

To see the Caregiver around you, look no further than the healthcare, insurance, and financial planning industries, as well as nonprofit or charitable organizations. Less obvious may be brands that have to do with maintenance or fixing broken things — activities such as cleaning, mending clothes, gardening, or general upkeep all call on the Caregiver’s tendency to nurture.
 
Companies that do these things on a large scale can tap into the Caregiver archetype quite successfully. Auto brands that emphasize the safety of their vehicles may also project the Caregiver mentality effectively. No parent would ever consider an unsafe car for his teenager, after all!
 
The marketing strategies of Caregiver brands will revolve heavily around providing helpful experiences and nurturing relationships. Marketing will often appeal to sentimentality, happy memories, the comforts of home and family, and feelings of safety and security. Visuals or multimedia may pull on soft color palettes, family imagery, and touching music.
 
Internally, a Caregiver organization will foster a relational culture that is typically highly structured or bureaucratic (in order to ensure an atmosphere of stability). Caregiver companies tend to treat their employees well; although, if the culture is not healthy, there is the risk of employee burnout due to the level of sacrifice expected from them.
 
The well-functioning Caretaker organization treats both its employees and customers with a high level of service, aiming to anticipate needs in advance and going above and beyond to accommodate them. In fact, exemplary customer service is a hallmark of a Caregiver brand. They just do nice things for others.

The Different Levels of the Caregiver Archetype

Each of the 12 archetypes exists in levels. The lower levels are less advanced while higher levels are more evolved.
  • Level 1: of the Caregiver brand archetype includes caring for one’s dependents.
  • Level 2: involves finding a balance between caring for oneself along with caring for others.
  • Level 3: speaks to an altruistic concern for the world at large.

All in the Family

The Caregiver archetype can be viewed from a few different angles, depending on which specific attributes are at play. The book Archetypes in Branding breaks it down into a family of sub-archetypes (including the primary Caregiver archetype) for a total of five.
  1. Caregiver
    • The Caregiver is good, compassionate, and empathetic, with a sacrificial concern for others. This sub-archetype remains calm in a crisis and remains optimistic. The challenge it faces is an inability to say no, always wanting to help even when it is detrimental to the self.
  2. Guardian
    • A defender of others, the Guardian is fiercely protective. Providing nurturing guidance and loving oversight, the Guardian tends to keep to traditions and values. The main challenge of the Guardian is the potential to be overbearing or misuse their power.
  3. Samaritan
    • The Samaritan is selfless and kind in their quest to love thy neighbor as thyself. This sub-archetype demonstrates compassionate action. It finds meaning in relieving others’ suffering. However, the Samaritan may face the challenge of self-martyrdom, if not careful.
  4. Healer
    • Strong in sensitivity, the Healer acts as a conduit to wholeness by creating optimal conditions for healing to happen naturally. With healthy doses of optimism and empathy, this sub-archetype remains full of faith, while remaining perceptive to others’ emotions. Unfortunately, the Healer can succumb to ego if holding too tightly to the idea of having the only right answer.
  5. Angel
    • The Angel sub-archetype exudes purity and humility. With infinite compassion, the Angel brings joy and laughter while providing aid and comfort. As the name implies, the Angel can help guide others to change their lives for the better — including facilitating spiritual connection and miracles. For the Angel, the challenge lies in having an unrealistic outlook — ignoring anything negative to focus only on the positive.

Real-world Example of the Caregiver Brand: The Salvation Army

The highest level of the Caregiver archetype is the altruist, focusing on serving the needs of the world at large. At this level, the Salvation Army serves as a fitting example of the Caregiver archetype.
 
For years, The Salvation Army has been ranked among the most trusted nonprofit organizations in America. With a tagline of “Doing the Best”, they have strongly branded themselves while providing social services to those in need for over a century.
 
They post their brand strategy online, which includes their Brand Personality: “Passionate. Compassionate. Brave. Uplifting. Trustworthy.” and their Brand Positioning: “To those who want to positively affect their world, The Salvation Army is the charity that maximizes contributions.”
Whenever you hear the sound of a ringing bell during Christmastime, there’s a good chance one of The Salvation Army’s red kettles is nearby to collect shoppers’ loose change. The red kettle is an integral part of The Salvation Army brand. One of their seasonal marketing pushes is “Red Kettle Reason” which is a campaign run during the holiday season to encourage giving to their organization.
 
Celebrity personality Nick Cannon is highlighted in a commercial from their 2015 campaign, in which he recounts his own childhood experience of being helped by The Salvation Army while espousing the shared values of faith and the responsibility of caring for others.
 
Not as recent, but still relevant is a commercial for a local Salvation Army Store, with a compelling call for you to help in their mission by donating what you can.
 
The global reach of The Salvation Army cannot be denied, as we see in this promo video a call for ministry participants during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Brazil to help with programs that will assist children and the poor.
 
Do you notice in all of these videos that children appear somewhere? With this, the brand manages to speak to the most primal instinct we all have, to protect and care for our kids, level 1 of the archetype, even while communicating on higher levels about helping society at large.

The Salvation Army as Hero?

With the Salvation Army also providing disaster relief and humanitarian aid, you’d be forgiven for thinking the brand could be a Hero archetype (as is another organization that occupies a similar space, the Red Cross).
 
Indeed, these two archetypes are similar in that they help others in need, and The Salvation Army may feel heroic to those who are on the receiving end of their help. However, the motivations of the Caregiver and the Hero are different. The Caregiver is driven by the desire to meet the needs of others, a social motivation. The Hero is driven by the need to prove worth through courageous action, a self-driven motivation.
 
The Christian foundation of faith and sacrifice is possibly what ties The Salvation Army and the Caregiver together so strongly. The Caregiver’s motto to “love your neighbor as yourself” is decidedly Christian, coming straight from the Bible, and aligns with The Salvation Army’s stated goal to “support everyone in need in His name without discrimination.” While the Red Cross and The Salvation Army occupy much the same space and provide similar services, it is their demonstrated brand positioning, culture, and values that set them apart from each other.

The Caregiver Consumer

Caregiver consumers are constantly trying to achieve balance in caring for others (kids, aging parents, and the world at large) versus themselves, so brands that can speak to this struggle will resonate with those individuals.
 
Following, the Caregiver consumer also likes to be recognized occasionally for their service, as it is a task that is often unappreciated or goes under the radar.
 
The Caregiver consumer isn’t easily fooled by everything it hears; it looks for brands that show they care instead of those that say they do. For brands looking to target the Caregiver consumer, it is imperative that the brands show authentic action and walk the walk.

Is Your Brand a Caregiver?

Ask yourself: Do you place a high value on serving or protecting others? Is your goal to help people care for other people, pets, society, or the world at large with sacrificial devotion? If you answered yes, it is very likely your brand is a Caregiver. To have the biggest impact, you should do all you can to communicate these values clearly and consistently, including in your marketing.
 
Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out an overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.

Brand Archetypes

Brand Archetypes — Meet the Jester Who doesn’t want to have a laugh?! The position of the Jester archetype is to deliver everyone collectively to play and respect the pleasure in lifestyles. As the last entertainer, the Jester is capable of making human beings sense properly — a sense that any logo would really like […]

To market to Jester purchasers, manufacturers should highlight how and what they communicate: Meet the Jester

Meet the Jester

January 22, 2023

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Brand Archetypes — Meet the Jester
Who doesn’t want to have a laugh?! The position of the Jester archetype is to deliver everyone collectively to play and respect the pleasure in lifestyles. As the last entertainer, the Jester is capable of making human beings sense properly — a sense that any logo would really like to have related to it.
 
Brand archetypes are the name of the game sauce to developing more potent manufacturers, and are vital devices for any advertising toolbox! To examine greater, examine the advent right here.

The JESTER

  • PROMISE: If you’re now no longer having a laugh, you’re doing something wrong.
  • CORE DESIRE: To stay withinside the second with complete enjoyment
  • GOAL: To have an awesome time and loosen up the sector
  • FEAR: Boredom or being boring
  • STRATEGY: Be humorous and playful
  • GIFT: Joy
  • MOTIVATION: Belonging
Real-World Examples of Jester Brands
  • Progressive
  • M&M’S / Geico
  • Jimmy Fallon
  • The Onion
The Jester archetype represents residing withinside the right here and now. The lifestyles of the party, the Jester simply wishes human beings to loosen up and experience themselves! The Jester permits others to hook up with their laugh internal child — impulsive and unrestrained, now no longer afraid to bend policies, now no longer afraid to face out, and snug of their very own skin.
 
The Jester additionally has the potential to assume outdoor the field, which results in revolutionary ideas. This approach the Jester is a grasp at brainstorming, reframing concepts, and offering new views. For instance, an ordinary Jester M.O. might be to provide a social difficulty or political schedule in a brand new mild to spotlight its underlying absurdity. Comedians are an apparent instance of the Jester, however, is genuinely now no longer the best class that identifies as this archetype.

The Jester Brand in Action

Jester manufacturers have a tendency to seize interest. The largest draw is generally its cleverness. While Jester manufacturers are normally expressed in entertainment, you may additionally discover them expressed in industries including coverage. Geico or Progressive come to mind, each of which selected to take a greater mild-hearted technique and in any other case severe industry.
 
Jester manufacturers aren’t afraid to bend policies or be politically incorrect, and that may be contemplated in manufacturers making mild of factors which might be possibly virtually severe troubles or selling something that isn’t virtually proper for you.
 
We all realize sweet isn’t healthy, however, let’s face it, the ones in M&M’S classified ads presenting the speak me-sweet characters of Red, Yellow, and Ms. Brown are funny sufficient to make us neglect all approximately that.
 
The advertising of Jester manufacturers can be unconventional, silly, or over-the-top. Often vivid colorings are used and the motion is high-energy. Jester manufacturers can be specifically interested in using digital stories like interactive websites or augmented fact apps.
 
The organizational subculture for Jester manufacturers is free and laugh-loving. Traditional “corporate” policies don’t observe right here. Jester manufacturers create their very own manner of doing matters, and because of their out-of-the-field wondering, the subculture is notably revolutionary of their operations or product offerings.

The Different Levels of the Jester Archetype

There are stages to every one of the 12 one-of-a-kind archetypes. The decreased stages are much less mature even as better stages are greater developed.
 
  • Level 1: The Jester expressed a degree one sees lifestyles as a game. The best vital component is to simply have a laugh!
  • Level 2: Level is greater advanced. Here, the Jester is expressed through combining a laugh with resourcefulness/intelligence (ensuing in such things as sensible jokes, or locating approaches to get around policies). This is wherein cleverness and innovation are developed.
  • Level 3: At the best degree, the Jester is aware that lifestyles are lived withinside the second. If all we’ve got is today, we ought to stay every day to the fullest.

All within Family

There are one-of-a-kind elements of the Jester archetype which could emerge, primarily based totally at the power of numerous attributes. The ee-e book Archetypes in Branding breaks the archetype down into sub-archetypes for a complete of five (which include the number one Jester) to spherical out the family.

Jester

Life is a playground for the Jester. With a penchant for irreverent antics and an appreciation for the equal, the Jester lives completely in every second. Able to reframe views and be unafraid to talk out, the Jester can venture conference in fresh approaches. The venture going through the Jester is that of being too insensitive or insolent.

Entertainer

The Entertainer is playful and caters to an audience. Giving human beings an amazing display is all that matters. Quick-witted and notably adaptable, the Entertainer desires consistent stimulation and feedback.

Clown

The Clown hides at the back of masks on the way to distance itself from severe or taboo subjects on the way to discover them. Highlighting the absurd in this manner permits the Clown to poke a laugh and entertain at an equal time. This sub-archetype is at risk of exaggeration and drama to make others giggle.

Provocateur

The Provocateur can be debatable and polarizing, however, does so with the allure and aura that makes it a Jester sub-archetype. Of direction, the venture for the Provocateur is to now no longer come off as impolite and offensive. But as a herbal communicator and with an in-your-face mentality, the Provocateur stirs up change.

Shapeshifter

The Shapeshifter acts as a chameleon, capable of navigating various conditions and stages of consciousness. Challenging others to impeach assumptions, this sub-archetype is a catalyst to assist others to see matters differently. The weak spot for the Shapeshifter is the inherent instability that incorporates being so adaptable.

Real-World Examples of Jester Brands

Progressive

Progressive’s spokesperson Flo is quirky and silly… precisely what coverage isn’t. Yet, through aligning with this positioning, Progressive lives as much as its call and offers human beings a brand new manner to narrate to coverage.
 
Their “Name Your Price” device (cited withinside the video below) is an end result of revolutionary out-of-the-field wandering through the agency in 2009, while it changed into anticipated human beings might cancel their insurance altogether to shop charges throughout the financial downturn.

M&M’S & Geico

In a crossover industrial among Jester manufacturers, acquainted M&M’S and Geico characters meet in a surprising and smart ad.

Jimmy Fallon

Late nighttime speak indicates have Jester written throughout them, and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon isn’t any exception. While Jimmy Fallon himself has an Everyman appeal, first and essential he simply likes having a laugh.
 
If you’ve in no way heard Fallon speak approximately why he does what he does, he sums up his motive right here: “…If all and sundry is struggling at all, that is my job. I’m right here to make you giggle. I need to make you’ve got got an amazing time.” His technique of creating the sector a higher location is to “make you giggle and positioned a grin to your face, so you can… stay extended lifestyles. Isn’t that the entire aim of what we’re doing — have a laugh?”

The Onion

Satirical information supply The Onion takes modern troubles and gives them thru the lens of the ludicrous… direction girded through the unnerving undercurrent of fact. Sometimes blurring the road of political correctness with taboo subjects or reporting style, The Onion indicates it isn’t afraid to talk about any information. In the funny video phase below, they subtly spotlight the factor that no person virtually is aware of what “the cloud” is.

The Jester Consumer

Jester purchasers have a tendency to be a more youthful demographic, even though of direction, there are human beings of every age who appear to be perpetually “younger at heart”. Jester purchasers are becoming off through severe subjects or those who are too severe, in order that they have a tendency to flock collectively with others of similar “carpe diem” attitude. They will keep away from doing matters which might be boring, although the one matters are vital.
 
To market correctly to Jester purchasers, manufacturers should discover approaches to be applicable and slice facets in how and what they communicate. This is specifically genuine if a logo wishes Jester purchasers to do something severe (like purchase coverage) — it’s going to want to discover a manner to reframe the preferred motion to be greater in keeping with the Jester mindset and interest span. The zanier the higher! Jester purchasers respect creativity and cleverness.

Is Your Brand a Jester?

Does your logo assist human beings experience lifestyles or stay withinside the second? Do you’ve got got a laugh-loving subculture? Is being smart or quirky a technique you operate to assist human beings to see something differently?

If so, you will be a Jester logo.

Still now no longer positive which archetype defines your logo? Take the logo archetype quiz to discover your consequences after which take a look at out a top-level view of the 12 logo archetypes to examine greater.

To market to Jester purchasers, manufacturers should highlight how and what they communicate: Meet the Jester

Meet the Jester

January 22, 2023

Brand Archetypes

It seems one of the highest compliments bestowed upon a celebrity is that the superstar “is so down to earth!” The comfort and appeal of knowing that something or someone who is larger than life is actually “just one of us” is the pull of the Everyman archetype, and brands that are relatable in this way will go a long way in capturing the hearts of their consumers.

Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are an essential tool for any marketing toolbox! To learn more, read the introduction here.

The EVERYMAN

  1. PROMISE: Everyone is created equal.
  2. CORE DESIRE: Connection with others
  3. GOAL: To Belong
  4. FEAR: Being seen as elitist, not being welcomed
  5. STRATEGY: Develop common virtues; blend in
  6. GIFT: Empathy and Authenticity
  7. MOTIVATION: Belonging

All About the Everyman

As modeled by the Regular Joe or the Girl Next Door, the Everyman archetype is wholesome and genuine – which makes it irresistibly likable! The Everyman tends to demonstrate the underlying American ideals of hard work and honesty and embraces common sense values and authenticity. The Everyman feels no need for pretense. It doesn’t desire luxury or measure itself by status symbols — as demonstrated by a high-powered executive who comes to work in jeans and sneakers, for example.
 
Everyman wants to fit in and be part of a group. Its motivation is to belong and be accepted. While this generally means a surface-level embracing of all people, it also manifests into a joining of cliques, social clubs, and memberships, to be around like-minded peers.
 
The Everyman brand archetype is easily seen in mom-and-pop stores, local diners, and community events that have a down-home culture, genuine and caring. TV shows like Friends, Seinfeld, and Cheers celebrate the simple joys of every day and being surrounded by people who know and accept you.
 
Personalities like country singer Blake Shelton win us over with homespun charm and good-natured humor. Brands like Wrangler Jeans, Wendy’s, Discover, and Budweiser are heavily dependent on the Everyman archetype. And even many who disagree with Barack Obama’s policies will admit that he himself is a relatable and likable guy. That’s the Everyman at work.

The Everyman Brand in Action

Everyman brands tend to have or portray a family culture, welcoming and inviting. Their products or services may have mass appeal or be applicable to a broad audience and are generally meeting a basic need, nothing fancy or extravagant.
 
The marketing of an Everyman brand often speaks in a colloquial voice and uses wholesome imagery. There are no outlandish claims, nothing designed to get shock value. Money-back guarantees and other trust-building elements are common. Everyman brands will find that social media is a great outlet for them, and smart brands will use it to become even more relatable, transparent, and helpful to their customers.
 
The organizational structure of an Everyman brand downplays hierarchy. Decisions are made democratically or by consensus. Working in teams is common. There is a strong sense of pride in the work that is done, and the atmosphere is comfortable and casual.

The Different Levels of the Everyman Archetype

Each of the 12 different archetypes has levels. The lower levels are less mature while higher levels are more developed.
  • Level 1: The Everyman archetype is expressed through seeking any sort of affiliation, typically spurred by feelings of loneliness.
  • Level 2: One learns how to connect (form and nurture relationships) and fit in.
  • Level 3: The dignity afforded to each person, regardless of differences, is realized and practiced.

All in the Family

There are different aspects of the Everyman archetype that can emerge, based on the strength of various attributes. The book Archetypes in Branding includes the Everyman as one of five related sub-archetypes.
  1. Everyman
    • What you see is what you get. Without pretense, the Everyman is sincere, helpful, and genuine. Wanting to belong and get along with others, this sub-archetype treats everyone with dignity and respect. Unfortunately, in an effort to not ruffle feathers, the Everyman may succumb to a herd mentality and lose its own identity.
  2. Citizen
    • The Citizen holds a deep responsibility to the community, believing there to be great value in the collective whole. With high integrity, the Citizen works for fairness and equality. The challenge for the Citizens is not to be overly zealous in their sense of righteousness.
  3. Advocate
    • The Advocate is compelled to work for the greater good on behalf of others. With passion and energy, this sub-archetype is able to motivate and inspire others to action while uniting people behind a cause. The Advocate should be careful, however, to not let personal gain overtake the greater good.
  4. Servant
    • The Servant is committed to helping others, whether in a subservient role or as a leader. With empathy, awareness, and commitment, the humble Servant asks for no reward for serving others. This can, however, become a weakness, leading to burnout or a desire for recognition.
  5. Networker
    • The Networker creates communities and connections for the benefit of the whole. With an outgoing nature, the Networker is a social butterfly, friendly and relatable. The challenge this sub-archetype may face is the temptation to manipulate connections for personal gain.

Real-world Examples of the Everyman Brand

Discover

The desire consumers have to be heard and understood is a frustration that many large corporate brands don’t address well. Discover’s well-known “We treat you like you’d treat you” campaign shows that this is a brand that cares about the experience of its customers, and is as relatable and responsive as you would be to yourself.

Budweiser

What brings people together better than a nice cold beer? Whether making new friends or relaxing with old buddies, there’s nothing pretentious about a Bud. Who doesn’t remember the classic “Whassup” Budweiser commercials? The original showcased the entertaining camaraderie shared amongst a bunch of guys — and inspired countless remakes that make this campaign one everyone can relate to.

Wrangler

If a nice comfortable pair of blue jeans isn’t Everyman, what is? Wrangler pulls very heavily on midwest cowboy culture, marketing to those who put in days of hard sweaty work. Along with their “Ultimate Cowgirl Next Door” contest, the brand epitomizes the Everyman principles of genuine, authentic, normal people who demonstrate American values.

Moe’s Southwest Grill

If you’ve ever walked into a Moe’s Southwest Grill, you’ll be greeted with a hearty and heartfelt “Welcome to Moe’s!” Every. single. time. It’s part of their laid-back and inviting atmosphere. Their brand video states: “We’re not fake, stodgy, or corporate. We’re open, honest, and down-to-earth. A place where friends, family, and coworkers check their worries at the door.” They have intentionally created a culture that feels very much like Everyman, where you’re free to be yourself, surrounded by friends.

The Everyman Consumer

Everyman consumers are neighborly, offering help when needed. They are respectful of others even when they don’t know (or particularly like!) them very much. They are reliable and believe in the merits of a hard day’s work. Usually frugal, they appreciate the simple things in life. They are humble and tend to root for the underdog.
 
Brands that want to attract Everyman consumers should focus on the experiences they provide to them. A brand that is approachable, responsive, and friendly will go a long way in reaching these consumers. Innovation, while always important, is less of an issue for Everyman consumers. With a quality product in tow, brands should go back to basics and focus on giving Everyman consumers the assurance of trustworthiness, reliability, and openness.

Is Your Brand an Everyman?

Does your brand help people fit in or feel comfortable being themselves? Do you promote down-home “old-fashioned” values? Are your products/services something used in common everyday life? If so, you may be an Everyman brand.
 
Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out an overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.

The Everyman brand archetype is easily seen in mom-and-pop stores that have a down-home culture: The Everyman

The Everyman brand archetype is easily seen in mom-and-pop stores, local diners, and community events that have a down-home culture, genuine and caring.

January 22, 2023

Brand Archetypes

Brand Archetypes

Imagine where we would be if there were no structure or order in our life. Despite the ease with which authority, control, and power can be abused, chaos nevertheless needs to be controlled. The brands that deserve the title of Ruler are those that can give the globe the safety and stability we all long […]

Natural leaders and Ruler customers frequently have a vast list of accomplishments and are great achievers: The Ruler

The Ruler archetype attempts to control chaos in order to avoid it.

January 17, 2023

The Ruler Brand Examples Archetypes Putnam Marketing

Imagine where we would be if there were no structure or order in our life. Despite the ease with which authority, control, and power can be abused, chaos nevertheless needs to be controlled. The brands that deserve the title of Ruler are those that can give the globe the safety and stability we all long for.

The RULER

  • PROMISE: Power is what moves the world
  • ESSENTIAL DESIRE: Control
  • GOAL: To foster growth and prosperity
  • FEAR: Disorder; overthrow
  • Exert strong leadership
  • GIFT: Accountability and initiative
  • MOTIVATION: Consistency
Brand Archetypes Putnam Marketing

All About the Ruler

The Ruler archetype attempts to control chaos in order to avoid it. The Ruler works to get (and maintain) authority because they want to feel comfortable and secure. The Ruler is attracted to things that are robust, ageless, and of the highest quality. He loves rules and regulations. This archetype wants to assist others in achieving success and security since it sees itself as a role model for others to follow.

Rulers follow the rules and conduct “correctly,” as the name suggests, and they also want others to do the same. Consider the extreme of a watchful mother rearing a responsible child. A brutal dictator at the other end is vying for control of the world’s nations. There is a vast spectrum that expresses the archetype between the two extremes.

For examples of the Ruler archetypes around us, we can look at Donald Trump, Verizon, Microsoft, Rolls Royce, Rolex, and Hugo Boss.

Using the Ruler Brand

Clearly, visible ruler branding can be seen in sectors like security, technology, banking, and government. They are suitable for any company that provides high-end goods or services. The marketing strategies they employ will appeal to consumers’ desires to be significant, powerful, and prosperous. Imagination is frequently formal, statuesque, regal, or refined. Costs range from moderate to expensive.

Within Ruler brands, there is a hierarchical organizational structure as would be expected, and positions are clearly defined. These organizations have a tendency to be extremely stable, functioning, and ordered, but they frequently lack the ability to respond quickly or change since decisions must follow a chain of command. Ruler brands frequently expand through acquisitions, absorbing their rivals and the underdogs.

The Ruler Archetype’s Various Levels

There are levels to each typology. Higher levels are more evolved or developed than lower levels, which are less sophisticated.

  • Level 1: Taking ownership of one’s life is level.
  • Level 2: Serving as an organization’s or family’s leader.
  • Level 3: Ascending the ranks of leadership within the community or in the government.

The Whole Family

One of five connected sub-archetypes described in the book Archetypes in Branding. Based on the relative strength of numerous traits, the many elements of the Ruler archetype emerge.

Ruler

Rulers have a strong sense of self-assurance and a natural drive to lead. They must feel in charge and competent due to their shown knowledge or skill. This sub-archetype aims to produce harmonious and effective surroundings. Its vulnerability stems from a desire to maintain control; as a result, it may overcompensate by becoming too authoritarian.

Sovereign

Exuding a sense of power and authority, the Sovereign maintains tradition while maintaining control and propriety in public. The Sovereign carries a great lot of responsibility and tries to behave accordingly, despite the fact that they can sometimes fall into the trap of entitlement.

Judge

Challenging wrongs that need to be righted by using judgment and knowledge, the Judge gives society order.

Ambassador

Acting as a mediator to settle conflicts, the ambassador uses cunning moves to restore harmony in troubled relationships or difficult topics. This sub-archetype faces difficulties because of the potential for abuse of its power.

Patriarch

The Patriarch serves as the head of the household, upholds law and order, and offers safety. This sub-archetype provides for those beneath it with courage and leadership, creating a sense of security. However, the Patriarch must exercise caution to avoid adopting an autocratic management style.

The Ruler Consumer

Frequently have concerns about their reputation, position, or prestige. They are drawn to Ruler brands because they want those brands’ potent perceptions to affect how other people view them.

Natural leaders and Ruler customers frequently have a vast list of accomplishments to their credit and are great achievers. They are therefore burdened with a great deal of responsibility and dislike following commands from others. Consumers of Ruler are frequently extremely patriotic and deeply appreciative of their nation’s laws, customs, and history.

Ruler customers have a more basic sense that they should be catered to by society. No standing in line, no being treated second-class, and no asking again. Those who don’t want special treatment will at least be appreciative at the higher level.

Brand Examples

Brand Archetypes Putnam Marketing

Verizon

Verizon firmly believes they are the “only number one,” as the saying goes. No matter where you are in the country, their assertion that they are better than everyone else is regularly supported by a number of sources and independent research. They would do well to keep in mind that, especially in light of current headlines, the vulnerability of being a Ruler is the propensity to be despotic. Verizon’s Ruler’s propensity to ignore or mistreat employees is alarming for a firm that makes billions of dollars.

Microsoft

Because of its widespread recognition and pervasiveness in our lives, Microsoft is generally regarded as a vital and reliable brand with wide appeal. However, throughout the years, Microsoft has been the target of numerous antitrust cases due to its quick ascent to supremacy.

Even though the corporation is now acting more cautiously, it finds it difficult to overcome the negative perceptions that were fostered by its misuse of the Ruler archetype. Thankfully, they are no longer seen as the “schoolyard bully” but rather more as the “class president,” although not everyone is convinced that they aren’t still striving to maintain their monopoly.

Royce Rolls

This Rolls-Royce commercial combines luxury and power with a passionate rendition of Everybody Wants to Rule the World.

Hugo Boss

The name speaks for itself. In this ad for men’s cologne, Hugo Boss, a retailer that specializes in designer apparel and fragrances, employs strong expressions like “go all the way,” “remain noble,” and “man of success.” (Gerard Butler’s seductive Scottish brogue helps, too!)

Do You Have a Ruler Brand?

Do you market high-end goods? or those that guarantee security and safety? Are you the industry leader? Or is your long-term strategy to take control of the market? Do you favor a highly organized workplace? Do you have a regulatory role in your town or industry? Any of these yes/no responses can turn you into a Ruler brand.

Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out the overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.

Brand Archetypes

Brand Archetypes — Meet the Lover ​Intimacy and connection — no man is an island. People want to feel special and the Lover brands exist to meet this need. In the journey we call life, what’s love got to do with it? Everything. Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are […]

Don’t be misled by the name; it’s not just about romance: The Lover

The Lover All About the Lover Don’t be misled by the name; it’s not just about romance. The Lover archetype encapsulates all types of love — parental, familial, friendships, spiritual, and romantic.

January 16, 2023

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Brand Examples Archetypes Putnam Marketing

Brand Archetypes — Meet the Lover

Intimacy and connection — no man is an island. People want to feel special and the Lover brands exist to meet this need. In the journey we call life, what’s love got to do with it? Everything.

Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are an essential tool for any marketing toolbox!

The LOVER

  • PROMISE: Love makes the world go ’round.

  • CORE DESIRE: To attain intimacy

  • GOAL: Being in a relationship with things they love

  • FEAR: Being alone or unwanted

  • STRATEGY: Become attractive to others

  • GIFT: Appreciation and passion

  • MOTIVATION: Belonging and connection

All About the Lover

Don’t be misled by the name; it’s not just about romance. The Lover archetype encapsulates all types of love — parental, familial, friendships, spiritual, and romantic. The Lover wants to have close relationships, achieve intimacy, feel special, and make others feel special, too. The Lover is passionate and unashamed in fostering relationships and expressing appreciation.

There is also a sensual aspect that the Lover archetype represents. Anything that pleasures the senses – beautiful things, enticing smells, indulgent foods – give joy and delight to the Lover.

We see this archetype expressed all the time, from Hallmark to Victoria’s Secret. Other examples are Beyoncé, Chanel, Godiva, SendOutCards, and eHarmony.

The Lover Brand in Action

Showing up in many industries it is naturally seen in cosmetics, jewelry, fashion, and food. Wine and gourmet chocolate? Yep. Spa treatments and beauty secrets? Check. Gifts just because? Check. With offerings like these, Lover brands help consumers to:

  • Find love or friendships

  • Show appreciation to others

  • Become more attractive to others

  • Pleasure their senses

Marketing for lover brands can run the gamut, depending on the type of love they represent.

What does the Lover look like?

Deep jewel tones or fiery red are often used, or they may be softer more romantic tones. Elegant script typefaces or handwritten fonts can make an appearance. It may be friendly or could be edgy and erotic (of course sex sells — you got that memo, right?). In all cases, the marketing focuses on the consumer, making them feel special, and always has a strong emotional appeal.

Customer appreciation is a way of life and is likely a big part of the business plan for Lover Brands. Staying in good relationships with those they serve and providing customer service keeps the customer madly in love with them. (Cue heart eyes emoji here.)

Organizationally, the Lover brand is intimate and elegant. It values partnerships and is collaborative and team-oriented, to the point of decision-making by consensus. Employees tend to be passionate about the vision and values, and the quality of relationships throughout the organization is high.

The passion of the Lover archetype is an asset. But it works both ways. On the negative side, passion can become jealousy, or in the case of brands, competitiveness that can take over if not careful.

Pricing for Lover brand offerings falls in the mid to high range.

The Different Levels of the Lover Archetype

Each archetype can be experienced or expressed at different levels. The lower levels are less mature while higher levels are more developed.

  • Level 1: The Lover archetype is pretty surface-level, in terms of intimacy. This is where we find the pure pleasure-seekers — the casual fling or one-dimensional friendships. Connections may be established and are likely even passionate, but they are not truly intimate or personal.
  • Level 2: of the Lover is all about forming deeper attachments and establishing commitments with who and what we love. We start to find fulfillment in these relationships.
  • Level 3: brings us to spiritual love. With a sense of wholeness and connection to others, it is a love that extends to humanity as a whole. Those who are familiar with the love of Christ can understand that as the ultimate expression, truly filling the deepest voids we have for love.

All in the Family

There are different aspects of the Lover archetype that can emerge, based on the strength of various attributes. The book Archetypes in Branding breaks these nuances down into sub-archetypes (including the primary Lover) for a total of five in the family.

  • Lover

    Faithful and passionate, the Lover is all about intimacy and togetherness. Don’t think it stops at kisses and roses, however. The Lover’s DNA pushes beyond romantic feeling to a state of being. The Lover appreciates beauty in various forms and values collaboration. The challenge facing the Lover is letting a fear of being alone, disconnected, or ultimately, unloved, overtake them.

  • Romantic

    Like The Commodores, the sensual Romantic just wants to be close to you. Charming and charismatic, optimistic and sociable, the Romantic can be intense emotionally. This sub-archetype may profess “you complete me”, due to a strong belief in the power of oneness that stems from a shared love. The Romantic can stumble over its own optimism, however. The challenge is in removing the rose-colored glasses and not get caught up in the chase.

  • Companion

    A Companion is loyal and trustworthy and is the comrade and confidante we turn to when we need a helping hand or a patient ear. This sub-archetype holds a deep respect for a person’s inherent value and values relationship. The Companion may be devoted to a fault — potentially leading to loss of self and a rise of dependency.

  • Hedonist

    The Hedonist is the erotic and sensual sub-archetype. Living in the moment, and living for pleasure, the Hedonist seeks out the exciting things in life to indulge in. The Hedonist must be careful of indulging too much. This sub-archetype may also show disregard for others in pursuit of pleasure.

  • Matchmaker

    The power of human connection and relationship dynamics are well understood by the Matchmaker, and this sub-archetype acts as a facilitator to draw people together. The Matchmaker uses strategy and intuition to spot patterns that can facilitate connections. The Matchmaker’s challenge is in allowing intuition to remain the guide when tempted to let judgment and personal agenda take over

Examples of Lover Brands

Hallmark is a perfect example of a Lover brand. Hallmark facilitates connection for every relationship in your life, romantic or familial. From National Boss Day to National Nurses Day, you turn to Hallmark whenever you want to show someone you are thinking of and appreciate them. Hallmark leads to closeness.

Christian Dior has known the world over for haute couture fashion, fragrance, and beauty products. Dior as a brand promises to make you beautiful and more desirable. The sensuality in the following Dior fragrance commercial blatantly speaks to the lower levels of the Lover archetype. Do you adore Dior?

And really, what better example of unconditional love than that of our furry family members? Pet brands often heavily pull on the Lover archetype. Are pets possibly the perfect companion?

The Mayhew Animal Home, an animal shelter in London, did a great job of showing how it feels to come home to ‘the one’ after a long hard day in a seemingly cruel and uncaring world.

Cesar, a dog food brand, featured a touching relationship between a man and his dog. What the following commercial does so successfully highlights a companionship dynamic as opposed to a caregiver dynamic. Instead of just a man and his dog, this becomes a relationship between two equals. Each one loves and is loved in return.

The Lover Consumer

The Lover consumer is driven to connect with others. In the Western world, we live in a society that has become more and more individualistic. As a result, the void for true meaningful relationships keeps getting bigger and bigger. The Lover consumer will look to fill this void in a myriad of ways — from seeking out like-minded people to bond with to creating the best version of themselves to attract others to them. Lover consumers want to feel special. They want brands that love them and that they can love back. If their needs aren’t met, brands risk losing them to a competitor that can make them feel special again.

Is Your Brand a Lover?

Are you passionate about people? Do you dote on your customers, knowing you are nothing without them? Do you help people find or deepen relationships or offer products that make them feel more attractive? Even if you don’t see your brand as romantic or sensual, if intimacy is the core tenet of your existence, you are likely a Lover brand.

Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out the overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.

Don’t be misled by the name; it’s not just about romance: The Lover

The Lover All About the Lover Don’t be misled by the name; it’s not just about romance. The Lover archetype encapsulates all types of love — parental, familial, friendships, spiritual, and romantic.

January 16, 2023

Brand Archetypes

Brand Archetypes The Hero Putnam Marketing

Brand Archetypes — Meet the Hero

The courageous triumph over adversity is the defining characteristic of the Hero archetype. Finding deep satisfaction, exhilaration, and purpose in this feat, the Hero archetype displays great tenacity to achieve it, with a “never give up” attitude. We’ve all been inspired — or saved — by a hero… where would we be without them?

Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are an essential tool for any marketing toolbox! To learn more, read the introduction here.

The HERO

  • PROMISE: Where there is a will, there is a way.
  • CORE DESIRE: To prove worth through difficult action
  • GOAL: To exert mastery in a way that improves the world
  • FEAR: Weakness or quitting
  • STRATEGY: Become as competent as possible
  • GIFT: Courage
  • MOTIVATION: Mastery

All About the Hero

The Hero archetype is all about rising to the challenge, and it instinctively seeks to protect and inspire others. Whether on the battleground, ball field, or political stage, the Hero is determined to leave a mark on the world, often at the risk of great sacrifice.

The Hero often must make tough decisions and think on their feet. The quintessential Hero seeks out challenges or feels ‘called’ to right a wrong, or both. The challenge to overcome may be humanitarian — to save the world at large — but may also manifest as a grandiose personal aspiration, like a resolve to scale Mount Everest.

It’s easy to picture comic book superheroes as iconic of this archetype. But in our everyday lives, we can look at Michael Jordan, Nelson Mandela, the Marines, Nike, and Red Cross as examples of heroes.

The Hero Brand in Action

The Hero archetype is a natural fit for philanthropic organizations or businesses that have corporate social responsibility as a core tenant of their existence. Along with social initiatives, the Hero is easily manifest through athletic brands and the military. These are brands that represent or help people develop discipline, focus, and strength.

The marketing of a Hero brand will often use powerful images and strong colors to communicate. It may use nature-inspired imagery that metaphorically represents a challenge, like tall mountains or rugged terrain. Definitive lines and shapes and roughness or texture will play a part in the visuals as well. The language will be idealistic, challenging, or noble — essentially saying “I dare you”, in a manner of speaking.

The organizational culture of a Hero brand is typically achievement-oriented, holds itself to high standards, and requires dedication. In an unhealthy organization, this may foster competition and employee burnout. In a healthy organization, there is a clear sense of convictions that are lived out daily and fuels the passion to make a difference and overcome challenges.

The Different Levels of the Hero Archetype

Each archetype can be experienced or expressed at different levels. The lower levels are less mature while higher levels are more developed.

  • Level 1: The Hero displays the ability to overcome — competence as demonstrated through achievement or victory in the competition.
  • Level 2: shows the Hero archetype faithfully serving others, often out of duty, commitment, or conviction.
  • Level 3: the Hero uses their strength and courage to make the world better. This requires the greatest level of sacrifice.

All in the Family

There are different aspects of the Hero archetype that can emerge, based on the strength of various attributes. The book Archetypes in Branding breaks these nuances down into sub-archetypes (including the primary Hero) for a total of five in the family.

The Hero is represented by sacrifice, courage, faith, and strength. This archetype lives to triumph over adversity and will overcome great odds to facilitate transformation. The downfall of the Hero may be triggered by an exaggerated sense of self-importance.

  • Warrior
    • In a word: fearless. The assertive Warrior has a strong sense of duty coupled with a healthy dose of bravery. Add to this a tactical mode of attack, and the Warrior is strong on strategy. The Achilles heel for this sub-archetype is a victory-at-all-costs mentality, in which the assertiveness turns a bit too aggressive.
  • Athlete
    • The Athlete’s goals revolve around physical ability and mental focus. Disciplined and achievement-oriented, the Athlete is relentless in pursuit of a goal. The desire to be bigger, stronger, faster, and better is natural for this sub-archetype. The Athlete must be careful, though, not to use their physicality to bully or harm.
  • Rescuer 
    • The Rescuer swoops in with a heart full of bravery to help others in need. With intuitive sensibilities and quick reflexes, the Rescuer becomes a familiar face in times of dire circumstances. The trap for the Rescuer? The misguided need to save someone just to prove its own worth.
  • Liberator 
    • Fighting on behalf of the disenfranchised and powerless, the Liberator is a champion for humanitarian rights, justice, and equality. With strong convictions and resolute hope, this sub-archetype does not accept defeat. The temptation for the Liberator is to allow the end to justify the means, however blurry the morality. Its staunch view of righteousness and justice can lead to revenge-seeking.

        Examples of Hero Brands

        Nike does Hero oh-so-well. Representing level one of the Athlete sub-archetype in the following commercial, Nike challenges every one of us to overcome the enemy within (our fears, doubts, and insecurities) …of course ending with the ultimate challenge — to Find Your Greatness.

        The Red Cross is an example of the Rescuer sub-archetype at the higher level, providing disaster relief and emergency response to those in time of need. Their 2015 year-in-review video combines an inspirational audio track with moving photos of those affected by a disaster along with those helping them through it.

        The International Labor Organization exists to promote social justice, human rights, and labor rights. Their video below speaks very aspirationally about the importance of social justice and ultimately asks the question “How can social justice be achieved for all?”

        The Hero Consumer

        The Hero consumer is typically achievement-oriented and competitive — even if just against oneself. In the quest to prove themselves, Hero consumers have the desire to develop their character or physical ability and are often tenaciously dedicated to overcoming challenges.

        Hero consumers often see themselves as good, moral people; and, naturally, they are attracted to brands that demonstrate their convictions. Therefore, to win a Hero consumer’s heart, a brand must realize it is being evaluated on much more than just its product offering, but on the strength of its moral convictions.

        Is Your Brand a Hero?

        Take a look at your brand. Is it fighting an invisible enemy to address a social problem? Is it challenging for people to get stronger and perform at their full potential? Is your underdog product actually the next big thing to change the world? If this resonates with you, your brand may be a Hero archetype.

        Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out the overview of the archetypes.

        The Courageous Triumph over Adversity: The Hero

        The Hero Archetype. Brand design is both a strategy and an art. We start by identifying your brand’s essence — its personality, motivations, and values — along with your audience, goals, and message.

        January 15, 2023

        Brand Archetypes

        Brand Archetypes

        A brand is a name, logo, slogan, and design scheme associated with a product or service.

        With the help of AI, marketing companies get customer location and the time spent on a particular brand: Why is Branding Important?

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona

        January 12, 2023

        Proper branding is one of the most critical activities a company can implement

        When an operation is small, branding is often lax because other activities like basic sales are more important, but once an operation reaches a critical size, branding becomes an important activity. 

        Proper branding is one of the most critical activities a company can implement
        Proper branding is one of the most critical activities a company can implement

        Over the first several years of the company’s existence, it’s been more important to have employees performing the proper sales activities rather than concentrating on every detail of the messaging. We have now reached that critical stage.

        So, what is branding?

        A brand is a name, logo, slogan, and design scheme associated with a product or service. Branding (promotional), is the distribution of merchandise with a brand name or symbol imprinted. Brand management is the application of marketing techniques to a specific product, product line, or service.

        Proper branding is one of the most critical activities a company can implement
        Proper branding is one of the most critical activities a company can implement

        Why is branding important?

        Brands strive to be top of mind with consumers. When you think of tissue, you think of Kleenex. When you think of soda, you think of Coca-Cola. When you’re in a retail establishment, standing before a shelf with multiple choices, you are more likely to buy a well-known brand because you believe you have a familiarity with the product and that it has properties other products do not. You may even be concerned that if you buy a product other than the dominant brand name, you may not get a quality item.

        We want your brand to be a brand that consumers who are considering the purchase or partnership of private label materials feel they think of first to collaborate with or at least consult.

        We start by identifying your brand’s essence — its personality, motivations, and values — along with your audience, goals, and message. Then we intentionally craft that message in your brand’s voice to resonate with your desired audience and motivate them to act

        The ultimate goal is that we are the top private label partner and the most obvious choice. The consumer should feel that it’s risky not to consult us because our brand is the gold standard. They should feel that another company may not provide the quality or expertise they expect.

        We want that level of recognition in our branding and it will be necessary to have all of us working together.

        Everyone should be using approved branded ads, collateral, and materials. We become a national/global brand by having a brand standard that is the same across our entire footprint. 

        Please use your brand’s branded materials on all printed materials.

        If you need custom marketing materials, feel free to contact the Putnam Marketing team.

        The most important factor is to publish quality content. Quality matters, and using sharp, intelligent content will lead to good results.
        The most important factor is to publish quality content. Quality matters, and using sharp, intelligent content will lead to good results.

        Brand Archetypes

        ​What is truth? If you are the Sage brand archetype, this is the question that keeps you up at night.

        A perfectionist by nature, the Sage won’t settle for ambiguity: The Sage

        ​What is truth? If you are the Sage brand archetype, this is the question that keeps you up at night.

        January 12, 2023

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        The Everyman Brand Examples Archetypes Putnam Marketing

        Brand Archetypes — Meet the Sage

        What is truth? If you are the Sage brand archetype, this is the question that keeps you up at night. A perfectionist by nature, the Sage won’t settle for ambiguity and is on a mission to analyze everything to find the right answer and share it with others. News outlets, museums, and universities fall under the Sage archetype.

        Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are an essential tool for any marketing toolbox! 

        The SAGE

        • PROMISE: The truth will set you free.
        • CORE DESIRE: The discovery of truth
        • GOAL: To use intelligence to understand the world
        • FEAR: Being duped; ignorance
        • STRATEGY: Seek out information; understand processes
        • GIFT: Wisdom
        • MOTIVATION: Independence and fulfillment

        All About the Sage

        The Sage believes the path to happiness is paved with knowledge and that by seeking out the truth and sharing it with others, we can make the world a better place. The Sage shuns ambiguity, misinformation, misleading claims, and ignorance, whether in itself or in others. Sage brands generally have high levels of consciousness and intelligence.

        Snags occur when the Sage becomes too focused on the dogma of objective truth and loses touch with social graces. (You Sherlock Holmes and House fans out there know what I’m talking about.) The neverending quest for absolute answers could also result in an acute case of “analysis paralysis” and prevent the Sage from ever taking action.

        The Sage Brand in Action

        Typically touted as “experts,” these brands act as sources of guidance to help consumers feel more informed to make better decisions. Well-known brands such as Oprah Winfrey, Harvard University, Mayo Clinic, The New York Times, and CNN all position themselves as beacons, shining the light of truth in a dark, often confusing, world.

        The Sage brand is a natural fit for any company that places emphasis on research and development, the acquisition of knowledge or disseminating information. Examples include institutions of higher education, news sources, research firms, museums, bookstores, and libraries.

        Brands that identify with the Sage often use polished and dignified marketing materials and don’t try to impress with superficial fluff or gimmicks. Sage brands tend to gravitate to a palette of neutral or subdued colors such as gray, navy, or white for their marketing designs and logos. Accordingly, some Sage brands produce marketing materials that veer from the status quo in an effort to make people see things in a different way.

        Adhering always to their quest for knowledge, Sage brands refuse to oversimplify their marketing, as that would be an insult to the intelligence of their customers. The focus instead is on knowledge and sometimes exclusivity. (Think Ivy League colleges, where not everyone is “good enough” and only a select few receive that coveted acceptance letter).

        The culture within Sage brands is often focused on analysis, learning, research, and planning. These brands encourage freedom of thought and individuality amongst their employees so they can develop the most valuable company asset – expertise.

        The Different Levels of the Sage Archetype

        Each archetype has levels, with the lower levels being less advanced, while higher levels are more evolved or developed.

        • Level 1: Conducting a search for absolute truth by looking to experts to provide answers and objectivity.
        • Level 2: Aim to become an expert through critical thinking and analysis.
        • Level 3: Achieving expert status through wisdom and a high level of confidence in one’s area of expertise.

        All in the Family

        There are different aspects of the Sage archetype that can emerge, based on the strength of various attributes. The book Archetypes in Branding breaks the Sage (including the primary Sage) into a total of five to complete the family.

        Sage

        Motivated by a desire to seek the truth, the Sage values knowledge, and learning. With an independent streak a mile wide and a healthy dose of skepticism, the Sage prefers to make rational decisions based on research.

        Challenges arrive in the form of arrogance and a rigid reliance on dogma. Others dread the classic “know-it-all” attitude and accompanying air of righteousness.

         

        1. Mentor

          The Mentor’s very existence is devoted to sharing wisdom for the benefit and support of others. The ability to remain objective and be a good judge of character serves the Mentor well and ups the level of trustworthiness. Everything the Mentor does is based on a desire to make sure the right outcomes are reached.

          The Mentor needs to be careful about dispensing all that info because a “helping hand” can easily morph into “an iron fist” if no one’s watching.
        2. Detective

          Like all great sleuths, the Detective diligently searches to uncover what is hidden. The Detective possesses a fondness for puzzles and has a keen eye for empirical evidence, but is also deeply intuitive and relies on instinct.

          Even if the Detective doesn’t want to admit it, the search for truth can be a selfish pursuit rather than for the benefit of others and the Detective may land in hot water if the search for truth turns into snooping.

        3. Shaman

          Spiritual in nature, although not necessarily tied to religion, the Shaman has a mystical power to see and tell the truth, particularly from a “higher consciousness” or alternative perspective. (Deepak Chopra is a good example of a Sage brand that would fall into this sub-archetype.)

          Dangers abound if the Shaman develops a false sense of power, as that could lead to bogus claims and manipulation.

        4. Translator

          A superb communicator, the Translator taps into universal truths by interpreting the meaning and connecting patterns. An intelligent messenger, the Translator is attracted to communication and language.

          Before sharing those divine truths with the world, the Translator would be well served to remember the old saying “Haste makes waste” whenever the urge to make premature conclusions strikes.

        Real-world Example of Sage Brands

        TED

        TED, which stands for Technology, Entertainment, and Design, is a nonprofit organization known mostly for its informational TED Talks on every subject imaginable. The group’s mission is to build “a clearinghouse of free knowledge from the world’s most inspired thinkers” and they believe in the power of ideas to change the world.

        Oprah Winfrey

        The Oprah brand positions itself as a source of information and enlightenment. Millions of people turn to her as a source of guidance and truth and accept her word as gospel. Evidence of the Oprah brand as a strong Mentor is everywhere: The Oprah Winfrey Show, the O, Oprah Magazine, a book club, and even her own television network. Oprah’s brand pulls double duty as a Mentor (a trusted source of empowering support) and as a Shaman (since many of her topics focus on spirituality). In many ways, Oprah could be considered the ultimate apprentice.

        The Sage Consumer

        Sage consumers are a tough bunch. They don’t succumb easily to the “herd mentality” because they recognize the value of independent thought. But if your brand identifies with the Sage archetype, you will be among like-minded folks when reaching out to your customers.

        Sage consumers enjoy learning for learning’s sake and for the pure joy of adding new knowledge to their memory banks. They appreciate brands that are transparent and tend to be suspicious of brands that act like they have something to hide. They revel in hard data and brands that can give them a limitless supply will earn their trust.

        When approaching Sage consumers, don’t engage in high-pressure sales and marketing tactics. Instead, give them the information they need to make an informed decision. Since intelligence is the trait they prize above all else, it’s no surprise that Sage consumers aren’t afraid of products with a challenging learning curve. Talking down to your audience or coming on too hard are sure ways to turn off a Sage consumer.

        Is Your Brand a Sage?

        While most companies will perform some type of research and development and hopefully don’t consciously strive to misinform, there are some brands for which knowledge and truth are top priorities, with no exceptions. If your company’s reason for being is to seek out the truth and provide expertise or information to others, or if you place a high value on knowledge, your brand is likely a Sage archetype.

        Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out an overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.

        A perfectionist by nature, the Sage won’t settle for ambiguity: The Sage

        ​What is truth? If you are the Sage brand archetype, this is the question that keeps you up at night.

        January 12, 2023

        Brand Archetypes

        Awakening the Heroes Within, Twelve Archetypes to Help Us Find Ourselves and Transform Our World, Carol S. Pearson

        People gravitate towards things that “speak” to them. It’s difficult to do that when you’re trying to appeal to everybody. You end up with a very weak message that no one person can actually identify with.
        People gravitate towards things that “speak” to them. It’s difficult to do that when you’re trying to appeal to everybody. You end up with a very weak message that no one person can actually identify with.

        According to The Hero and The Outlaw, archetypes have existed as long as mankind has told stories. They are evident in every compelling story: whether it is a play at your neighborhood theater or a blockbuster film, certain characters emerge (Mark & Pearson, 2001).

        Brand design is both a strategy and an art. We start by identifying your brand’s essence — its personality, motivations, and values — along with your audience, goals, and message. Then we intentionally craft that message in your brand’s voice to resonate with your desired audience and motivate them to act

        The paradox of modern life is that at the same time that we are living in ways never done before and therefore daily recreating our world, our actions often feel rootless and empty. To transcend this state, we need to feel rooted simultaneously in history and eternity.

        The goal of changing lead into gold on the physical plane was always secondary, for genuine alchemists, to the greater spiritual goal of raising leaden consciousness to golden consciousness.

        That is, we expand Ego consciousness to experience Soul, and in the process give birth to the Self. The achievement of changing led to gold on the physical plane was thought to be an outer sign of the more important inward, spiritual accomplishment.

        The various chemical procedures that separate out the essence of the gold (Spirit) from lesser elements (matter) parallel the stages of the hero’s spiritual journey out of consensual, Egodominated reality into the transmutable, spiritual domain, and then back, to transform physical reality as Spirit is made manifest on earth. The final stage of the alchemical process—symbolized by royalty, gold, and the sun—signifies the successful ability to manifest a spiritual truth on the physical plane.

        The Innocent

        ARCHETYPE: Innocent
        GOAL: Remain in safety
        FEAR: Abandonment
        DRAGON/PROBLEM: Deny it or seek rescue
        RESPONSE TO TASK: Fidelity, discernment
        GIFT/VIRTUE: Trust, optimism

        The Twelve Archetypes -Essential Explanation

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona

        January 11, 2023

        Brand Archetypes

        Brand Archetypes

        Does your brand feel at home in the wilderness of nature? Or does it help people discover new things? Maybe it focuses on nonconformity and enabling people to find freedom and express their individuality. If any of these things strike a chord with you, you may be an Explorer brand archetype.

        ​Finding oneself, self-realization through discovery, is the ultimate goal of the Explorer: The Explorer

        There are different facets of the Explorer that can surface, based on what attributes are strongest. The book Archetypes in Branding breaks the archetype down into sub-archetypes for a total of five (including the primary Explorer) to round out the family.

        January 11, 2023

        Brand Archetypes — Meet the Explorer

        The Explorer Brand Examples Archetypes Putnam Marketing

        Brand Archetypes — Meet the Explorer

        Finding oneself — self-realization through discovery — is the ultimate goal of the Explorer. In our Western culture, the Explorer archetype is an undercurrent running through all of society. Brands that spring forth from this current are those that speak to the need for freedom, adventure, and independence.

        Brand archetypes are the secret sauce to creating stronger brands, and are an essential tool for any marketing toolbox! 

        The EXPLORER

        • PROMISE: Forge your own path.
        • CORE DESIRE: The freedom of discovery: of oneself and the world
        • GOAL: To experience a fulfilling and authentic life
        • FEAR: Inner emptiness or feeling trapped
        • STRATEGY: Seek out new things
        • GIFT: Ambition
        • MOTIVATION: Independence and fulfillment

        All About the Explorer

        The Explorer archetype stems from a need to be individualistic and have purpose or meaning. This archetype strives to answer the questions “What am I here for? What is my purpose?” by exploring and learning from the world around it. Adventure is a means of enlightenment, and the Explorer is focused on self-discovery and self-sufficiency.

        Tending to be critical of the establishment, the Explorer desires to be free from constraints. But instead of challenging the establishment (as a Hero or Outlaw might), the Explorer simply goes off in a different direction, seeking a new path. Ultimately, all it desires is the freedom and joy of discovery.

        This archetype can be seen in brands such as NASA, National Geographic, The Body Shop, and Jeep.

        The Explorer in Action

        Out of all 12 archetypes, the Explorer is one that is less obviously tied to a particular industry or category. The Explorer archetype can very legitimately be expressed in cosmetics and fashion just as well as it can in a rugged outdoorsy brand.

        Explorer brands are often ground-breaking or pioneering. Any brand, in any industry, that veers off the beaten path and forges its own, is tapping into Explorer tendencies. Nonconformity is one of the hallmarks of an Explorer brand.

        The organizational culture of a brand may also define it as an Explorer. A culture that values individuality and de-emphasizes rules are typical for Explorer brands, giving employees the leeway to reach goals however they see fit. The organizational structure of an Explorer brand is decentralized and democratic and tends towards virtual workers and tools as opposed to having employees boxed in a cubicle.

        The Different Levels of the Explorer Archetype

        Every archetype can be expressed at varying levels. The lower levels are less mature, while higher levels are more developed.

        • Level 1 of the Explorer is very straightforward, expressed by exploring the world and getting out into nature.
        • Level 2 is expressed when the exploration turns inward into discovering what makes oneself unique. It is the process of seeking one’s own individuality.
        • Level 3 is reached when the journey has led to one’s own Promised Land, a place of knowing who you are, with the freedom to be completely true to who one is and express that uniqueness fully.

        All in the Family

        There are different facets of the Explorer that can surface, based on what attributes are strongest. The book Archetypes in Branding breaks the archetype down into sub-archetypes for a total of five (including the primary Explorer) to round out the family.

        1. Explorer

          Independent and brave, the Explorer is motivated to experience new things. Pushing boundaries and taking risks are commonplace. The challenges that can arise throughout this quest are the tendency to become alienated or wander aimlessly without true progress.
        2. Adventurer

          The Adventurer is daring and spontaneous, with a “no fear” attitude. This sub-archetype is recognized by its taste for danger and thrill — the rush of adrenaline is its lifeline. This addiction to adrenaline, however, could make it tough for the Adventurer to find happiness in the more mundane aspects of life.
        3. Pioneer

          The Pioneer is known for being the first to break ground. Innovative and driven, this sub-archetype blazes new paths. In Pioneer’s quest for discovery, it should be careful to avoid burnout or dissatisfaction with being less than #1.
        4. Generalist

          The Generalist believes that the entire world is open for experience and therefore is stimulated to explore many divergent areas. The Generalist has a great diversity of talents and knowledge, and this broad understanding may earn him the label of a Renaissance man. The challenge? Overstating or misrepresenting its level of knowledge.
        5. Seeker

          The Seeker continuously strives to grow and learn. Tireless and ambitious, the Seeker leaves no stone unturned in its path to find meaning. Finding joy in discovering rather than relationships, the Seeker is constantly on the go, which, unfortunately, can lead to loneliness and alienation.

        Real-World Examples of Explorer Brands

        Jeep

        Hello, quintessential Explorer. After this commercial for Jeep, nothing more needs to be said. The song includes lyrics: “4 by 4 by land, 4 by 4 by sea, 4 by 4 by air ’cause they like to fly free … For my country how it all started out … doin’ it yourself ’cause you want it done right … top-down, stars keep you up at night” might just be the anthem for all Explorers.

        REI

        REI, the outdoor sports retailer, is well-known by participants in outdoor activities like hiking, skiing, or cycling. We only need to look at REI’s Instagram feed to see the Explorer spirit alive and well. A recent video campaign also highlights this love of the outdoors. 

        As one of the campaign producers elaborates on the process, he hits on the core of the Explorer quest. “REI isn’t about extreme sports or getting outside and doing outlandish stuff, instead, it’s about how being outside brings something out of you.” In the video featured below, the subject discusses how exploring the woods and becoming a “trail angel” helped him overcome his own struggles with depression and an abusive childhood.

        NASA

        Nothing says Explorer like journeying into the vast unknown voids of space. NASA’s 2015 Year in Review video pretty much sums it up. “Off the Earth, For the Earth”

        The Body Shop

        The Body Shop, when it first started, was a pioneering brand. It campaigned for ethical business practices and safe natural cosmetics before these ideas were mainstream. That core of authenticity, doing things differently, and making the world better, has remained even now, 30 years later. The Explorer archetype is further strengthened in their commercial below that takes us on a journey to Ethiopia, so we can see how the honey used in their products is sourced (with Fair Trade practices).

        The Explorer Consumer

        To market to Explorer consumers, a brand needs to really understand its mindset. Explorer consumers are trying to figure out their place in the world. This manifests abundantly in the younger generation – from pink-haired pre-teens attempting to assert their independence and figure out who they are to recent college graduates taking a year off to “find themselves”.

        But Explorer consumers are not just the young. The Explorer consumer can also be someone in the throes of a mid-life crisis, looking for new experiences to make himself feel alive. Or an entrepreneur launching out to start a business because she wants to do things the way she believes they should be done.

        Explorer consumers may enjoy outdoor sports, not necessarily for competitive reasons, but rather to engage in nature through solitary pursuits like long-distance running or biking. They are wary of being tied down and may shy away from things like marriages and mortgages.

        The Explorer consumer may be either

        • Energetic, enthusiastic, and eager OR
        • Suffocated, searching, and alienated

        Or, most commonly, a combination of both. The Explorer is often caught in a dilemma between expressing individuality and being too different. In this vein, Explorer consumers respond well to brands that can seem to empathize with the internal desires and conflicts they face and yet promise a reward worth seeking out.

        The Explorer consumer values brands that are authentic. Skeptical of advertising hype, they are more convinced by organic buzz — real people spreading the word about a brand or experience. The restless Explorer isn’t big on brand loyalty. Change is a natural state of mind, after all. So, to win devoted Explorer consumers, a brand must be able to tap directly into the archetypal values of freedom and individuality and express those values authentically.

        Is Your Brand an Explorer?

        Does your brand feel at home in the wilderness of nature? Or does it help people discover new things? Maybe it focuses on nonconformity and enabling people to find freedom and express their individuality. If any of these things strike a chord with you, you may be an Explorer brand archetype.

        Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out an overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.


        There are different facets of the Explorer that can surface, based on what attributes are strongest.
        Still not sure which archetype defines your brand? Take the brand archetype quiz to find out your results and then check out an overview of the 12 brand archetypes to learn more.

        Brand Archetypes

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona, making it more instantly recognizable and relatable to target audiences.

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages: What Are the 12 Brand Archetypes?

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona, making it more instantly recognizable and relatable to target audiences.

        January 11, 2023

        READ MORE

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona, making it more instantly recognizable and relatable to target audiences. Brand archetypes offer businesses a personality that makes them approachable and relatable to people that share similar values.

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        What are Brand Archetypes?

        Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Carl Jung proposed that humans utilize symbols to help them grasp complicated topics. According to him, there are collective patterns or symbols that appear virtually everywhere on the planet as elements of myths and, at the same time, as individual creations of the subconscious.

        Jung believed that some pathways to better human knowledge have remained both recognized and ageless throughout history and that these pathways should be classified.

        Furthermore,  those classifications displaying clearly known personality traits—especially in the case of brands, by customers and organizations trying to identify their customer populations, are referred to as archetypes according to Jung.

        History of Brand Archetypes

        The concept of ‘brand archetypes,’ as we know them now, originated with Carl Jung, a psychologist who collaborated with Sigmund Freud. He thought that everyone had fundamental human needs that were both primal and instinctual.

        Each of our wants is associated with a distinct brand archetype. The notion is that by adopting a certain personality, businesses may demonstrate to their consumers that they understand their wants, expectations, and pain areas.

        Brand archetypes have the power to embody and reflect the personality of brands and assist them in better connecting with specific customer personas. As it relates to brands, the concept of archetypes is generally ubiquitous and may be especially useful as an orienting tool for brand managers wanting to concentrate their team’s efforts.

        Using Brand Archetypes to represent the embodiment of particular wants and behaviors. When you comprehend your firm and your consumer, you may build a brand archetype that enables you to connect to a certain type of consumer. 

        This aids in the development of better client relationships, reducing the risk of your company becoming a commodity. Archetypes can help you identify your brand by emphasizing your own personality. Customers will automatically choose the firm with which they feel more at ease while looking for solutions to their difficulties.

        The Purpose of Brand Archetypes

        Archetypes are universal human urges that may be tapped into. They take sales pitches and marketing efforts and turn them into a persona that customers can relate to.

        This all sounds nice, but you are undoubtedly asking how archetypes connect to corporate goals. Consider the following purpose of archetypal branding to further understand why they are important to your bottom line:

        Supports Brand Experience

        Set the tone for consumer interactions and relationships. A brand with a caregiver archetype, for example, will emanate a helpful, friendly, and supportive attitude. After establishing these qualities, a consumer will set expectations for the new brand experience. 

        Ideally, the brand lives up to the hype. When this occurs, a consumer comes to trust you and your products. A loyal client base is built on recurrent, consistent interactions.

        Adapts to Customer Desires

        Another purpose of brand archetypes is that they may be individually adapted to the requirements and desires of your market. There is an archetype for everything, whether it be creativity, drive, or invention.

        Therefore,  companies employ brand archetypes to connect an audience’s needs with product offerings. This enables people to understand how your product may help you achieve your own goals, leading to deeper, more real interactions with customers.

        Helps Separate your Brand Competitors

        Do you want to know how to stand out in a competitive marketplace? A powerful brand archetype might just be the solution you’re looking for. Brand archetypes motivate you to go deep into your brand’s history and discover the why behind your business.  

        The people, places, and concepts that influenced the origins of your brand are really unique to your brand. This is extremely critical to keep in mind, especially if your business and another company in your chosen industry have the same archetype.

        12 Brand Archetypes

        Identifying the right brand archetype is an important step toward creating a brand identity to which your target audience can relate.

        In fact, the world’s most successful companies have well-established archetypes that are represented in every element of their brand heart, voice, and identity.

        Choosing the right archetype can also improve your brand’s positioning and provides consumers with the brevity they need to grasp your brand’s why. 

        To help you select the right brand archetype, here are Carl Jung’s 12 brand archetypes:

        1. The Outlaw

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Outlaw

        The Outlaw is an outrageous, startling, and disruptive archetype. If your brand is not afraid to challenge others and change the game, it is an Outlaw. They are out of the ordinary and guarantee total rebellion in all positive ways. Outlaws are incredible. They love to go all out, and they often do it with style.  It is exciting and there is a lot to learn from it. 

        Keep a close eye on them because you will surely have a great time enjoying how they represent their respective brands. Vans, Harley Davidson, Snickers, and other brands are some of the best examples of Outlaw brand archetypes.

        2. The Magician

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Magician

        When we talk about this brand archetype, the first thing that comes to mind is none other than Disney. The brand is all about bringing magic and glitters into our everyday lives, from its fantasy films and music to the magical experience brought by its world-famous amusement park, Disneyland.

        • Is your brand creating a significant influence on your consumers?
        • Is it possible for your brand to make problem-solving enjoyable?
        • Is your brand a source of inspiration for everyone’s imagination?

        If your answer to most of the questions above is “yes” then your brand is likely to be a Magician archetype. Magicians do not only think outside the box; they put the box in front of you and present you with a surprise.

        3. The Hero

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Hero

        As an idealist, the Hero strives for excellence, meticulousness, and fearlessness. Simply said, if your brand guarantees excellence together with trust and self-assurance, it is a hero, both literally and metaphorically. The best thing about engaging with a Hero brand is that they will either go to great lengths to ensure you are acknowledged or take excessive time to answer. 

        The Hero brand archetype also rises to the occasion. They promote the importance of self-confidence and change.  As a result, a firm like Nike is regarded as a transformational instrument that helps individuals reach their greatest potential, rather than a footwear supplier.

        4. The Lover

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Lover

        The Lover brand archetype encourages closer connections through passion and romance.  But it is not all about that; the Lover promotes spiritual, family, and companionable ties as well. The emphasis for Lover brand archetypes is on strengthening connections with the individuals and things that truly matter. How can you tell whether your brand is The Lover archetype? Here are some guide questions:

        • Is your brand sensuous, emotional, and loving?
        • Are you a giver and visually pleasing?
        • Do you believe in peace and a pleasant environment?

        The goal of the Lover brands is to connect to Lover personas in their target market by making them feel wanted, valued, and sought. They stimulate passion and delight in connecting with these customers. Their speech has a sensuous tone to it, and they use seductive language and phrases.

        5. The Jester

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Jester

        In branding, the Jester personality archetype enjoys living life to the fullest and having a good time for themselves and others. These brands are upbeat and look for the positive in every scenario.

        Because they have never lived within one, jesters think outside the box, which makes them exceptional inventors. On the surface, Jesters live for the present, but on a profound level, they recognize that life is short and that laughter should be included in it.

        The Jester brands connect to individuals who are youthful at heart.  The Jester companies are associated with fun times and the light-hearted, optimistic side of life in their branding strategy. Laughter is how they communicate and engage with their target audience.

        6. The Everyman

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Everyman

        Everyman brand archetype is defined by a sense of belonging and recognition. These businesses prioritize the ability to blend in with the crowd and appear to be an “ordinary guy.” In whatever part of their work, these brands are not over the top. The Everyman archetype is trustworthy, optimistic, and eager to fit in. 

        The Everyman is your everyday person: unpretentious, approachable, decent, and at ease. Hard labor, common sense, dependability, and honesty are important to The Everyman.

        They aim to attract a wider audience, therefore they do not bother with the frills of grandeur. The Everyman connects with families and people from many cultures, connecting to individuals who live below the luxury line and, as the company puts it, “understand the worth of money better.”

        7. The Caregiver

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Caregiver

        When you think of The Caregiver archetype brands advertise their altruistic nature and publicly declare their desire to protect and care for people in need. The Caregiver brands are proactive and responsive, and they are present wherever a negative occurrence transpires.

        • Do you want your brand to be associated with empathy, assistance, and selflessness?
        • Is your brand putting emotions first and in the correct places?
        • Is your brand charitable and promotes people-protection initiatives?

        Their branding approach focuses on assisting those in need, who are frequently fragile and sensitive individuals who demand a personal touch. They send forth warm and meaningful signals and treat life and work with generosity.

        8. The Ruler

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Ruler

        When you think of Rolls Royce or Rolex, power words such as control and luxury are the way The Ruler brand archetype expresses and communicates control. These brands place a premium on authority and are confident in their communication and actions. They exhibit supremacy and exercise leadership. They desire riches and success, which they seek to pass on to others who come after them. 

        They are self-assured and responsible, and they appreciate having a sense of control. To attract their target audience, these companies’ goal is to reassert a sense of authority, power, and respect. They radiate a feeling of privilege and grandeur.

        By seizing authority, the Ruler eradicates ambiguity. They enjoy following rules, but much more so, they enjoy making them. Rulers believe in doing things the right way and creating solid, well-known businesses to match. They also want others to act with decency.

        9. The Creator

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Creator

        Innovation and creativity drive The Creator brand archetype. These businesses appreciate uniqueness and skill, and they invite everyone to participate in or watch the realization of their vision. In order to cater to target audiences, the Creator’s branding approach involves honoring their innovation side and encouraging artistic freedom.

        The Creator brand archetype is also preoccupied with realizing its ideal. Brands must demonstrate their capacity to create opportunities for self-expression. This archetype will interact with only the most free-form items that promote creativity rather than impose use.

        10. The Innocent

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Innocent

        Brand Archetype the Innocent is all about happiness and optimism. The brands that use this archetype want everyone to be happy as well as protected.  The Innocent, who bears no grievances, is genuine and fair, believing that everyone should be who they actually are.

        With transparency, easiness, and positive optimistic messaging, Innocent branding usually appeals to the target population in a captivating way. Innocent brands are associated with security and trustworthiness among these consumers. True Innocent archetypes can also recognize and understand that everyone has the right to live and the yearning to be happy.

        11. The Sage

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetype. This helps to accurately describe your brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Sage

        In branding, the Sage archetype is portrayed as a seeker of knowledge and intelligence. These companies exude expertise and a sense of being well-informed. Their motivation is to learn about the world and share what they have learned with their followers. Sage’s branding approach appeals to the target audience while also recognizing their intellect. 

        Complex meanings and technical terminology, as well as well-researched content, are valued by these companies. It is advisable to avoid employing simple methods when trying to communicate with Sages.

        Brands must demonstrate a high degree of competence and comprehension. Sage archetypes are meticulous scholars who despise misinformation and incompetence.

        They have a greater degree of intellect and social awareness than other people. Therefore, they are frequently considered reliable and knowledgeable sources of information.

        12. The Explorer

        At Putnam Marketing we help our partners identify their brand archetypes. This helps to accurately describe a brand’s qualities and vision.
        The Explorer

        The Explorer’s brand identity embodies a desire to step outside of their comfort zone and into an unknown situation where they feel more relaxed. These companies promote boldness, as well as a passion for exploration and taking risks.

        In order to appeal to the explored customers, this archetype’s branding approach focuses on challenging them. These businesses emphasize the outdoors and the unknown, inviting consumers to join them in their exploration.

        Explorers, on the other hand, are not looking for upheaval or conflict. When taking on difficulties, they are comparable to the Hero.  They are looking for thrills and action, and businesses should be able to provide it.

        Top Reasons Why Brand Archetypes Are So Effective

        Connections and partnerships are increasingly defining today’s brands.

        Consumers expect firms to be more accountable and trustworthy. Workers want a stronger feeling of purpose in their jobs. And businesses are always looking for new methods to create more effective and compelling brand experiences. This is why identifying your brand archetype will assist you in achieving a variety of business and communication goals.

        Here are the major reasons why brand archetypes are so effective:

        1. Helps establish your identity as a brand

        Determining which of the 12 brand archetype your brand belongs to provides it with personality and significance.  It creates a vivid image in your consumers’ thoughts and distinguishes your brand and messaging from those of competitors in the same industry. After all, people are drawn to brands whose ideals are similar to their own.

        2. Accurately position your marketing strategies 

        Brand archetypes can make the implementation of your marketing strategies become a breeze.  This is especially crucial nowadays, given the prevalence of social media. Consumer engagement can begin anywhere. This is why knowing your archetype is extremely beneficial when it comes to positioning your strategies and yourself as a brand.

        3. Promotes employee and customer loyalty

        Brand archetypes inspire loyalty in both employees and customers. When people choose to do business with you, it shows that they believe in your brand’s core values. After all, the most successful businesses are those whose values, mission, and vision are founded on well-defined brand archetypes. Today’s consumers do not simply buy a product; they purchase the value and reputation that comes with it.

        4. Supports product innovation and development

        Product innovation can be aided by understanding your brand archetype. Great products, from their usefulness to their appearance, are a reflection of their brand archetype. The success and adoption of new products among your target audience will provide feedback that will encourage improvements in your next cycle of product innovation.

        Why Use Brand Archetypes?

        When it comes to business, archetypes provide brands and organizations with what they want most: individuality, commitment, and sustainability. Let’s take a look at the multinational conglomerate company Virgin Group’s statement about their branding:

        “For over 50 years, the Virgin brand has been renowned for providing unique and exceptional customer experiences. Each Virgin branded company brings a fresh, innovative, and distinctive consumer proposition, shaking up the status quo to create businesses that lift experiences out of the ordinary. This clear focus on the consumer has given the brand the ability to expand into new sectors and new geographies. From Virgin Money’s unique customer store concepts to Virgin Red’s fresh perspective on rewards and how Virgin Voyages is set to re-invent the cruising experience – each Investee Business and Licensee strives to put the customer experience at its heart. Virgin’s brand purpose is Changing Business For Good.”

        We connect and relate to every brand archetype’s persona and objectives. They are timeless and universal, representing our most basic wants and desires. They help us get to know the business and its products better.

        Conclusion

        Choosing an archetype can help you to accurately describe your brand’s qualities and vision by anchoring you to a set of character traits. This will ensure that you stay true to your principles and establish a position that consumers can trust and relate to.

        Brand archetypes could also aid in a better understanding of your own company and the creation of targeted marketing strategies that emphasize the values you want to convey. Not to mention, if the business stays true to its principles, it will be renowned for what it says as a brand and not just its products. 

        A brand archetype, when used effectively, can really help leave a lasting impression on your audience, whether you are a small startup or a large business.

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages: What Are the 12 Brand Archetypes?

        A brand archetype is a way of presenting a brand – its metaphorical meanings, values, behaviors, and messages – as a persona, making it more instantly recognizable and relatable to target audiences.

        January 11, 2023

        Brand Archetypes

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